the CURRENT SESSIONS

a performing arts organization + presenting series in NYC

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT #8: Stephanie Acosta with Jesse Young

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Know first about some of our Artists and their Companies on our ARTIST SPOTLIGHT leading up to Volume IV, Issue II.! Learn a little about who they are and what they are most passionate about!


Today’s SPOTLIGHT is:

Stephanie Acosta with Jesse Young



WEBSITE: stephanieacosta.org

THREE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE YOUR CHOREOGRAPHY:
Illuminating Somatic Accumulation

ABOUT Stephanie
A multidisciplinary artist focusing on exploratory means to experiential ends. Acosta blends performance and video with practice based research placing materiality of the ephemeral at the root of her practice, questioning the making of immovable meanings in our manufactured limitations.

Stephanie Acosta resides in NY/Chicago where she works extensively with unseen histories, performance modes, experimental radio and independent film. Acosta can also be found creating with NO ONE IS ANYWHERE and with collaborators across the country including Daviel Shy Films, Atom-r, Manuel Vason, Jessie Young and Robin Deacon. 

ABOUT Stephanie’s CREATIVE PROCESS 
Research, document, archive and exploratory systems are engaged in considering out given subject’s subjectivity. Utilizing the semantic within the somatic to find blurring lines of connection and container. in other words we make images to translate into visceral experience, we use duration to talk about weight, we spend time with gestures and ideas allowing for their proximity to inform relation. 

Do you work in other mediums other than dance? Any other special talents? 
An inherently multidisciplinary practice including film making in analonge and ditigal modes, sculpture, installation, projection and sculpture. 

What artists are you influenced by? Why so?
The works of ensembles such as Goat Island and Every House Has a Door, the films of Cauleen Smith and the writing of Eileen Myles and Sarah Schulman. Those who utilize the challenging of a mode to discuss the challenges of our time. 

What is your most memorable moment as an artist, thus far?
In 2013 our ensemble performed in Puebla Mexico, in the courtyard of a former prison, on coble stones, in what was now a space for creative gathering, and there we performed Falling Things. 

We’re all physical beings! What’s your favorite part of the body and why?
The mouth, for its metaphors and its surprising variability. 

FOLLOW Stephanie
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/stephanieacosta
TWITTER: @wakingstephanie
INSTAGRAM: @wakingstephanie 

Check out Stephanie at Volume IV, Issue II., on Friday, August 22nd at 7:30pm + Sunday, August 24th at 3pm!

Volume IV, Issue II. is happening August 22-24!!! 
Get your tickets 
HERE!

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT #7: Robert Daniel Holmes Maynard

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Know first about some of our Artists and their Companies on our ARTIST SPOTLIGHT leading up to Volume IV, Issue II.! Learn a little about who they are and what they are most passionate about!


Today’s SPOTLIGHT is:

Robert Daniel Holmes Maynard



WEBSITE: rdhm.net

THREE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE YOUR CHOREOGRAPHY:
Audacious, Irreverent, Sincere 

ABOUT Robert
Robert Maynard is a choreographer, control freak and sporadic drag queen. Having studied at the The University of the North Carolina School of the Arts, Ballet Austin, The Rock School, The Boston Conservatory, and the School at Jacob’s Pillow, Maynard places his classically trained body squarely in the center of a polarized dance world. His work layers disparate genres and attitudes into collages of spectacle that merge rigorous dance technique with crafted theatricality. As such, it exemplifies the compilation and complication of the male/female, the crude/refined, the classical/contemporary, the gaudy/subdued and houses contradiction after messy contradiction. 

ABOUT Robert’s CREATIVE PROCESS 
Everything I create is done because it cannot simply be written down. My body in space represents years of experience, knowledge, and rebellion, and these can be read from the arch of my neck to the slope of my ankle. The “stories” of the body are nonlinear, imprecise, and flawed. I am not looking to tell you something specific and concrete. If I was, I would write you a letter. 

Do you work in other mediums other than dance? Any other special talents? 
I am starting to experiment with dance on film to create tangible artifacts out of my performances. Film allows me to cater the viewing of the body much more precisely than with live dance. 

What artists are you influenced by? Why so?
I think Raja Kelly / The Feath3r Theory is on to something exciting right now. I appreciate anything that earnestly investigates different genres of performance in conversation with each other. 

Say what you want to say! Have a quote you live by?
Performers should earn attention rather than demand it. There is already too much noise to just start screaming. 

FOLLOW Robert
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/rdhmaynard
TWITTER: @THErdhm
INSTAGRAM: @THErdhm

Check out Robert at Volume IV, Issue II., on Saturday, August 23rd at 7:30pm + Sunday, August 24th at 3pm!

Volume IV, Issue II. is happening August 22-24!!! 
Get your tickets 
HERE!

Photo credit: Andrew Jordan

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT #6: Guest Artist // Danielle Russo

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Know first about some of our Artists and their Companies on our ARTIST SPOTLIGHT leading up to Volume IV, Issue II.! Learn a little about who they are and what they are most passionate about!


Today’s SPOTLIGHT is:

Danielle Russo 



WEBSITE: daniellerussodancecompany.com

THREE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE YOUR CHOREOGRAPHY:
"Dramatically Eloquent Athleticism" Deborah Jowitt (The Village Voice, 2008)

ABOUT Danielle
Danielle Russo has been presented nationally at the American Dance Festival, Jacob’s Pillow, The Yard; internationally in Austria, Belgium, Canada, France, Mexico, Panama, South Korea, Spain and Sweden. In 2012, she was a grant recipient with the Foundation for Contemporary Arts to present at the 80th Anniversary Season of Jacob’s Pillow and selected to represent the United States alongside John Jasperse at the inaugural PRISMA Festival de Danza Contemporánea. In 2013, she was invited to present her multimedia solo work with artist Jin-Wen Yu at the World Dance Alliance Assembly. International artist residencies have included Nadine Laboratory for the Contemporary Arts (Brussels, Belgium), Independent Artists’ Initiative WUK (Vienna, Austria), PA-F Performing Arts Forum (St. Erme, France) and Springboard Danse Montréal (Québec, Canada). Currently, she is an Artist in Residence at home in Brooklyn with Chez Bushwick. Russo is a recipient of a BFA in Dance and a BA in Anthropology from New York University (Tisch School of the Arts) and a MFA in Dance from Hollins University | American Dance Festival where she attended on fellowship. Acclaimed dance critic Deborah Jowitt has recognized Russo for her “dramatically eloquent athleticism”. (The Village Voice)

ABOUT Danielle’s CREATIVE PROCESS 
I craft sensoriums; stages that extend their arms and hug the audience in such a way that the dance contains them. My movement aesthetic, methodology and mission is rooted in a study of intimacy; innate intimacy that glistens in lived behavior versus the inherent contradiction of choreographed intimacy. My process, whether whole or in part, integrates public space with the intent of heightening awareness and response to the subtle sensations that anchor the intimate experience. I have installed performances in surreal environmental conditions either amplified or augmented by my own doing: parlors flooded by 400,000 white roses, cement pillars suspending bodies with industrial cellophane, foyers recarpeted in inexhaustible bubble wrap, the occupation of immense water concourses, the spoon-feeding of German chocolate cake to a string of strangers, so on and so forth. These projects are embedded in a tender curiosity of the theatrical transcendence of the seen body, and consequently, trends of merit stemming from the simplicity of being exposed. My objective is to create a safe space that reinforces and respects audience agency, mobility and consent in the hope of establishing an honest exchange of vulnerable time and space. 

Do you work in other mediums other than dance? Any other special talents? 
I dabble in digital integration, particularly with the use if TroikaTronix® Isadora. I’m still learning! 

What artists are you influenced by? Why so?
Maya Deren, Pina Bausch, Meg Stuart, Marlene Dumas, Yvonne Meier, Cy Twombly, Niki de Saint Phalle, Ana Mendieta, Ilse Bing, Marina Abramović, Noémie Lafrance, Tania Bruguera, Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen, Yves Klein to name a few. Why? Intellectually potent, politically assertive, viscerally striking, consciously and responsibly at risk for research that embraces the real versus the represented.

What is your most memorable moment as an artist, thus far?
I had a ticket to Pina Bausch’s “Palermo, Palmero” at Opernhaus Wuppertal in January 2011. She made it rain cinnamon for 20 minutes. Need I say more?

We’re all physical beings! What’s your favorite part of the body and why?
Despite living at the mercy of my feet, I think that my favorite body part(s) might be my hands. So many memories have slipped, scarred and seeped into my hands. 

FOLLOW Danielle Russo
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/Daielle-Russo-Dance-Company
TWITTER: @RussoDance
INSTAGRAM: @DanielleRussoDanceCo

Check out Danielle Russo at Volume IV, Issue II., on Saturday, August 23rd at 7:30pm + Sunday, August 24th at 3pm!

Volume IV, Issue II. is happening August 22-24!!! 
Get your tickets 
HERE!

Photo credit: Steven Schreiber

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT #5: EmmaGrace Skove-Epes

Know first about some of our Artists and their Companies on our ARTIST SPOTLIGHT leading up to Volume IV, Issue II.! Learn a little about who they are and what they are most passionate about!


Today’s SPOTLIGHT is:

EmmaGrace Skove-Epes



WEBSITE: emmagrace3.flavors.me

THREE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE YOUR CHOREOGRAPHY:
Idiosyncratic, Self-reflexive, Ritualistic

ABOUT EmmaGrace
EmmaGrace Skove-Epes is a choreographer, dancer, and Brooklyn native. She received her BA from Bard in 2008 and is currently pursuing her MFA at Sarah Lawrence. Her choreography has been presented at AUNTS/Arts@Renaissance,  Brooklyn Bridge Park, Center for Performance Research, Gibney Dance Center, Gowanus Arts Exchange, HERE Arts Center, Irondale Center for Theater, Judson Memorial Church, Nothing Space, Paradise Theater, Theaterlab, Triskelion Arts, Westbeth, and the 92nd street Y. She has choreographed and performed works for inclusion in films by writer-directors Crichton Atkinson, Leonora Colen, Ricki Gluski, Allie Tsypin, and Ian Turner. She currently dances for choreographer Jodi Melnick.

ABOUT EmmaGrace’s CREATIVE PROCESS 
I engage movement as an immersive kinesthetic, visual, and sonic medium and use it as my primary lens through which to view other artistic media. It’s inherent in all forms of art whether in the process or the product, as well as all aspects of existence, thus the variety of ways it makes itself visible are infinite. I’m interested in using performance as a ritual of communication between myself, my collaborators, whoever may be witnessing, the space, and visible or invisible forces in that space. I’m interested in creating spaces where audiences can become aware of all of the choices they have in how they engage the act of watching.

Do you work in other mediums other than dance? Any other special talents?
I sang with a few bands for a while and recently started tackling my own sound design. Even if I don’t use sound design for a piece, I feel like I often make choreographic decisions based just as much on how the movement sounds in a space as on how it looks or feels.

We’re all physical beings! What’s your favorite part of the body and why?
Many favorites, but my most consistent favorites are feet. They’re beautiful and weird looking and complex and smartly designed. I like thinking of them as the floor of my body when I’m upright. I’m impressed by their ability to mediate the weight of our whole bodies through such a small surface area, and by how much detoxification can happen through them.

What is your most memorable moment as an artist, thus far?
Unexpectedly bursting into tears on stage. I was dancing in a work by Nadia Tykulsker/Spark(ed)it Arts and there was a moment  in which I had to yell a lot. I’ve never been someone who could cry on command, nor was I trying to in this moment or really very interested in it as a skill for myself. There was no clearly explainable reason for why I began to cry other than feeling taken over by the act of yelling in a way that I’d never been able to access in my day to day life. To release emotion in a way that was totally new for me and very real and raw in that moment and to have both loved ones and lots of strangers in the audience there to witness and accept it was very powerful for me.

Say what you want to say! Have a quote you live by?
“Here in this body are the sacred rivers, here are the sun and moon as well as all the pilgrimage places…” -Saraha

FOLLOW EmmaGrace
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/emmagrace.skoveepes
INSTAGRAM: @emmagrace_emmagrace

Check out EmmaGrace at Volume IV, Issue II., on Friday, August 22nd at 7:30pm + Sunday, August 24th at 3pm!

Volume IV, Issue II. is happening August 22-24!!! 
Get your tickets 
HERE!

Photo credit:  Ian Douglas

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT #4: Nicole von Arx

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Know first about some of our Artists and their Companies on our ARTIST SPOTLIGHT leading up to Volume IV, Issue II.! Learn a little about who they are and what they are most passionate about!


Today’s SPOTLIGHT is:

Nicole von Arx



WEBSITE: nicolevonarx.com

THREE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE YOUR CHOREOGRAPHY:
Detailed, Groovy, Texturized

ABOUT Nicole
Born in England and raised in Switzerland, Nicole von Arx now lives between Geneva and New York. As a performer, she worked for Carte Blanche, The Norwegian National Company of Contemporary Dance, the Metropolitan Opera and freelanced dancing for New York City based artists. In 2013, she participated in The 6th Copenhagen International Choreography Competition while dancing for the choreographer Bryan Arias winning 1st place and Audience Choice Award. Her choreography has been presented in Switzerland at the Flux Laboratory, Reykjavík 2011 Culture Night in Iceland, at the Dumbo Dance Festival in Brooklyn and in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala.

ABOUT Nicole’s CREATIVE PROCESS 
My inspiration comes from the world that surrounds me, the people I meet, different sounds, textures and emotions. I don’t believe in just the form, athleticism and aesthetic of the work. I feel compelled to recreate aspects of the world we live in and, consequently, give the reality a deeper meaning.

 My work process is a continuous discovery in which I evolve by giving myself creative tasks. I use images, stories and music/sounds to generate movement and illustrate the theme I am exploring. Most of all, I collaborate with artists that inspire the work with their own voices, while striving for risks and avoiding clichés.

Do you work in other mediums other than dance? Any other special talents?
The past three years, I have been continuously collaborating and working with painters, film directors, photographers, actors and musicians. I am drawn to them because of their strong individual voices that inspire my own creativity and work process.

What artists are you influenced by? Why so?
I feel extremely lucky to have either studied or worked with artists such as Etienne Frey, Bryan Arias, Summer Lee Rhatigan, Alex Ketley and Hofesh Shechter. They have been a huge influenced in my growth as a mover, thinker and creator. All are great visual artists, some passionate dreamers, that I constantly find myself referring to. 

What is your most memorable moment as an artist, thus far?
I had a few turning points in my career. One of them was moving from Switzerland to New York. Leaving the safe, comfortable, clean streets of Geneva, and landing into a multicultural, hectic and challenging city filled with hungry talented artists. Another would be my return back to Europe for half a year last summer to work with Carte Blanche, The Norwegian National Company of Contemporary Dance. Having a similar experience to the one stepping into New York, I had to reconnect with the European lifestyle and creative world after being abroad for six years. 

As much as I like to think we, people around the world, are all connected, I believe there is a uniqueness in each culture that needs to be acknowledge. With our incredible access to information through the web, we tend to lazily blend things together as one. After traveling so much, I realized that it’s not about trying to understand each other, but to cooperate when needed and mostly respect each other in any kind of way. 

Say what you want to say! Have a quote you live by?
#chronicoles

FOLLOW Nicole
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/nvarx
INSTAGRAM: @nicolevarx

Check out Nicole at Volume IV, Issue II., on Friday, August 22nd at 7:30pm + Sunday, August 24th at 7pm!

Volume IV, Issue II. is happening August 22-24!!! 
Get your tickets 
HERE!

Photo credit: Claudia Zakrzewski 

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT #3: Sophie Sotsky | TYKE DANCE

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Know first about some of our Artists and their Companies on our ARTIST SPOTLIGHT leading up to Volume IV, Issue II.! Learn a little about who they are and what they are most passionate about!


Today’s SPOTLIGHT is:

Sophie Sotsky | TYKE DANCE 



WEBSITE: tykedance.com // oozlum.com

THREE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE YOUR CHOREOGRAPHY:
Effort, Endurance, Endorphin 

ABOUT Sophie
Sophie Sotsky is a Brooklyn-based dancer and choreographer. Since founding TYKE DANCE in 2011, Sotsky has shown her work at Movement Research at The Judson Church, The Center for Performance Research, Triskelion Arts, Dixon Place Theater, The Panoply Performance Laboratory, Soundance Studio Theater, AUNTS at Arts @ Renaissance and The Chocolate Factory Theater presents Sarah Maxfield’s THROW, curated in 2012-2013 by Lindsey Dietz Marchant.

When not dancing Sophie works as a production electrician, lighting dance at New York Live Arts, The Kitchen, The Chocolate Factory and a handful of other venues.

Sophie writes about contemporary performance for Posture Magazine. 

ABOUT Sophie’s CREATIVE PROCESS 
My dances investigate the themes of exertion, exhaustion, effort and error.
I work closely with Physical Ordeal:

  • As a method of inquiry into dance as time-based art.
  • To un-abstract the performing body without the use of imported narrative. (To humanize.) 
  • To poke fun at dance — the difficulty of it, the hopelessness of it all, and the archaic nature of requiring such an enormous amount of energy for a thing perceived to have such a comically low payoff.
  • To romanticize dance — the difficulty of it, the hopelessness of it all, and the quixotic nature of such an undertaking.

What artists are you influenced by? Why so?
My first choreographic influence is Ms. Elizabeth Streb. From very early on in my dance making I was obsessed with Streb’s aesthetic of brutality, toughness, strength and power. But my use of these themes does not constitute a direct replication of Streb’s aesthetic; it’s in conversation with hers— Streb uses the accomplishment of extraordinary feats to portray her dancers as superhero-like (un-human); I use the attempting of extraordinary feats, and often the failure to expertly perform them, to portray my dancers as extremely human (un-superheros).

More recently, I’ve been thinking about the work of Minneapolis-based choreographer, Morgan Thorson. As a student at Wesleyan University, I saw her masterful “Heaven” (2009), and was deeply moved by it. Ms. Thorson told us afterwards in a talk-back with the audience that she had sought to portray her dancers as comprising a spectrum of gender. She told us that, in her mind, Heaven was a place free from gender. Indeed, the piece featured effeminate men wearing skirts and dresses, short-haired masculine women and a host of other people — some who seemed androgynous or generqueer in their appearance, and others who appeared to be traditionally identified, or cisgendered. Yet when they stood together, all dressed in white (various shades and textures, though), they seemed, beautifully, like one entity.

I feel strongly about working with a cast of people who are as different from one another as they are from me. Not only different in terms of identity signifiers such as gender identity, but also different in terms of physicality, dance training, and points of engagement with dance or physical practices. Some of my dancers are masterfully classically trained and some have no dance training at all. Yet I still work a great deal with group unison. I am trying to show a spectrum whose poles are equally beautiful despite their distance from one another. —Many spectrums, actually. I want to portray each performer as unique, as beautiful, and as a human being. Thorson’s notion of a heavenly spectrum, I feel, speaks strongly to my own aesthetic value system: exertion, exhaustion, effort and error — and therein, humanness. 

Say what you want to say! Have a quote you live by?
"Maybe it’s some pointless act like… pouring water into an old pan that has a hole in the bottom, but at least the effort you put into it remains. Whether it’s good for anything or not, cool or totally uncool, in the final analysis what’s most important is what you can’t see but can feel in your heart. To be able to grasp something of value, sometimes you have to perform seemingly inefficient acts."

-Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running 

FOLLOW TYKE DANCE
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/TYKEDANCE
TWITTER: @TYKEDANCE
INSTAGRAM: @TYKEDANCE

Check out TYKE DANCE at Volume IV, Issue II., on Friday, August 22nd at 7:30pm + Sunday, August 24th at 3pm!

Volume IV, Issue II. is happening August 22-24!!! 
Get your tickets 
HERE!

Photo credit: Lindsay Keys

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT #2: Wynn Holmes // Street Parade

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Know first about some of our Artists and their Companies on our ARTIST SPOTLIGHT leading up to Volume IV, Issue II.! Learn a little about who they are and what they are most passionate about!


Today’s SPOTLIGHT is:

Wynn Holmes // Street Parade 


WEBSITE: www.vimeo.com/streetparade

THREE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE YOUR CHOREOGRAPHY:
Dexterous, Rhythmic, Explosive

ABOUT Wynn
Wynn Holmes is a multidisciplinary artist that draws from her passions of minimalist art and design, dance, music, and fashion. The works she creates, whether dance choreographies or music, embody a stylistic sense of modernism ; shapes, colors and ephemeral textures play vital roles within a milieu of controlled chaos.

ABOUT Wynn’s CREATIVE PROCESS
My work’s philosophy can be crystallized in an exploration of the intersection where art and culture not only express a societal truth, but the act of the art’s creation reveals to us the truest aspects of ourselves. Dance inspires us to reach a shared understanding as each time a new piece of work is woven into our culture, it becomes a part of us and most fundamentally changes who we are. It’s this push and pull, this play that inspires most of my work.

Do you work in other mediums other than dance?
I work equally in music and dance. I sing and play keys in my band, Heartcopy.

We are all physical beings! What’s your favorite part of the body and why?
Hands! Think about all the things that they can do and create. Gestures from clenched fists to elegant extensions can be more expressive than words.

What is your most memorable moment as an artist, thus far?
There was a moment very recently - I finally learned to embrace the fact that I was a choreographer AND musician and that both of these passions and professions could co-exist. It may seem obvious that music and dance are complimentary to each other but I fought for so long to keep them separate entities and thought that I could only do one or the other. Realizing that being a choreographer would not take away my credibility as a musician and vice versa was a really defining moment for me. 


FOLLOW Wynn Holmes
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/wynn.holmes
TWITTER: @wynn_holmes
INSTAGRAM: @wynnholmes

Check out Wynn Holmes at Volume IV, Issue II., on Saturday, August 23rd at 7:30pm + Sunday, August 24th at 7pm!

Volume IV, Issue II. is happening August 22-24!!!
Get your tickets
HERE!

Photo credit: Saad Al-Hakkak

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT #1: Colby Damon

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Know first about some of our Artists and their Companies on our ARTIST SPOTLIGHT leading up to Volume IV, Issue II.! Learn a little about who they are and what they are most passionate about!


Today’s SPOTLIGHT is:

Colby Damon



THREE WORDS THAT DESCRIBE YOUR CHOREOGRAPHY:
Fluid, Fantastical, Felt

ABOUT Colby
Colby Damon has danced professionally for the Sacramento Ballet, Northwest Dance Project, Mark Morris Dance Group, Thang Dao Dance Company, The Met Opera Ballet, and BalletX. He has choreographed on the Sacramento Ballet, Charlottesville Ballet, and Opera Philadelphia, and his works have been selected for performance at the Current Sessions NYC, YES! Dance Festival, and Pennsylvania Ballet’s “Shut Up and Dance”. He is certified yoga instructor, and is active in the fight against “fracking” and other fossil fuel extraction operations in the state of Pennsylvania and throughout the USA. He sends wishes of peace to all sentient beings.

ABOUT Colby’s CREATIVE PROCESS
Dance is a primordial art form which existed in nature and in wo/mankind before other forms of comminication were forged. Connecting to the primordial, mystic essence within the body, exploring ways to communicate that connection, and centering on themes of relevance for this day and age are the chief aims of my personal art making practice, in the hope that I may aid in the evolution of consciousness for myself and society. I play the guitar, and write/compose songs. I also practice

What artists are you influenced by? Why so?
In dance I am influenced by classical virtuosity with innovation, so Baryshnikov is a huge influence. I also enjoy reading mystic poetry and philosophy like Rumi, Zhuang Zi, Patanjali and such, in order to get beyond the constructs of the mind, and move towards a more subconscious, innate gnosis. Losing self consciousness while improvising on stage.

We are all physical beings! What’s your favorite part of the body and why?
I love all of the little cells that selflessly work together to make the larger whole function. Its incredible to think.. over 30,000,000,000 of them, all allowing the functions we take for granted, with us on top having little daily cognition of their profound brilliance.

Say what you want to say! Have a quote you live by?
We are living in crazy times. The level of consciousness is rising to new levels, but we are facing greater threats to our inner and outer environments than ever before. I hope artists can respond to this time by providing the deep, insightful meaning that desperately needs to be injected into contemporary culture.


FOLLOW Colby Damon
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/robert.c.damon

Check out Colby Damon at Volume IV, Issue II., on Friday, August 22nd at 7:30pm + Sunday, August 24th at 3pm!

Volume IV, Issue II. is happening August 22-24!!!
Get your tickets HERE!

Photo credit: Alexander Iziliaev

Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker, En Attendant & Cesena, at BAM
Photo: Elyssa Goodman


"You are my heat and glare"
Kimberly Bartosik
Photo: Elyssa Goodman